Hot Seat Narratives: Paul Tisdale and Exeter City: A Complicated Relationship

9433996131_f85847efa1_z

In the summer of 2006, a group of Exeter City fans bumped into a well-known Football League manager and conversation turned towards the managerial vacancy at St James’ Park. The advice was unequivocal. “Get in Jimmy Quinn. He’ll get you promoted, no worries.” It seemed like sound advice. Quinn had recently got Shrewsbury promoted from the Conference at the first time of asking and was available after leaving Gay Meadow. What’s more, his success in Shropshire meant Quinn was the first choice of many Exeter fans. Those who didn’t favour Quinn were clamouring for former City captain Shaun Taylor. Almost…

Hot Seat Narratives: Watford’s Managerial Carousel

13888693292_9ed90e3c2a_o

In passing judgement on Watford’s unusual managerial goings-on this season, one really needs to take a step back and appreciate the backdrop to a bizarre period that saw five different men – four full-time appointees and one stand-in – take charge of Watford within less than six weeks. So… for those that have been paying no attention at all, here’s a whistle-stop summary. The Pozzo family bought Watford in 2012. Three positive seasons under the management of Malky Mackay and Sean Dyche had concealed and been achieved despite bedlam in the boardroom. The previous owners, a group including Lord Ashcroft,…

Hot Seat Narratives: Alan Pardew’s Charmed Existence at Newcastle United

Pardew

“It will be the greatest comeback since Lazarus.” The late, legendary darts commentator Sid Waddell may have been talking about Cliff Lazarenko, but, had he been alive in 2014 to witness the annus horribilis endured by the manager of his beloved Newcastle United, he might well have been moved to say the same thing about Alan Pardew. And yet, incredibly, the comeback appears to be on. In mid-October, Pardew was a dead man walking: in charge of a winless side apparently resigned to taking up long-term residence in the relegation zone, under the sort of pressure usually experienced at the…

Book Review: Hard Case: The Autobiography of Jimmy Case

8494690229_7cbe3b9fdc_o

Hard Case by Jimmy Case Published by by John Blake Publishing 2014, £18.99 In advance of a salvo posts on the precariousness or otherwise of the managerial hot seat which we shall be running next week, we are pleased to first present to you a review of former Liverpool and Brighton and Hove Albion man Jimmy Case’s new autobiography. One of my earliest footballing memories is of Case lashing in a screamer against Manchester United in the 1977 FA Cup Final. Here, Terry Clague, aka @RoutledgeEditor, provides his thoughts. Terry has also written for The Anfield Wrap, one of our…

A Short History of Football and Music: 2000 to the Present

Mark E. Smith, THE FALL, This Is Not A Love Song

With football cock of the walk as the new millennium dawned, the extended love-in with music and other elements of popular culture continued to drag on through the early years of the decade. Soccer AM remained as popular as ever, Doves’ anthem Pounding soundtracked Saturday lunchtime’s On The Ball presented by Gabby Yorath, Sham 69 enlisted Blur guitarist Graham Coxon on a reworking of one of their most famous hits, producing the subtle Hurry Up England, and those chancers Kasabian took the stage for a gig in Paris sporting the national team’s new replica shirt. But such antics were to…